Jean-Paul Gaultier is a French fashion designer born on 1952 in Val-de-Marne, France. At age 18, he joined the house of Pierre Cardin before moving on to Jacques Esterel and Patou. The appearance of Gaultier’s collection was in 1976, but his own design house was only launched on 1982. Jean Paul Gaultier‘s sensual, irreverent style continually challenges stereotypical femininity, ignoring traditional gender roles by embracing androgyny and the freedom of sexuality. His style is known to challenge standard views of fashion.
The 66 years old diva, Donna Karan is one of the most influential fashion designers in the world. Her line of cloths was created for women to where when they are going to a cocktail party straight from work. Sleek and practical basics are mixed with glamorous and feminine pieces. To sum up, Donna Karan has left a lasting impact on the world of clothing, bringing uptown New York chic into the mainstream.
Range planning includes the creation of the ratio of garments to be selected in any given collection. For example, a basic range plan may be formed of four skirts, three trousers, six tops, two jackets and two dresses in three colour ways. Every collection needs a breakdown of units (garments) to enable the looks to be worn with enough combinations. If more volume sales come from tops it makes knowledge to supply more of these when editing the collection.
Chic is characterized by being trendy and fashionable. It is a type of statement to make oneself look smart and striking. Whoever follows this style makes sure to choose well tailored stylish designs that are pretty classy. Strong colors which are not extravagant, comes as a part of the chic style. It is something that relates to being casual in not so casual way. If you are part of this style, your wardrobe is a symbol of style.

"Leather has become a key player in our wardrobes; it’s now much more accessibly priced and the breadth of styles means we can wear it all year long. Designers manipulated this fabrication which draped and felt like wool, cotton or silk," says von der Goltz. "Faux leather continues to be a rising trend, with Nanushka leading the way. Nearly half of our Nanushka buy for A/W 19 is made up of vegan leather looks."
Yves Saint Laurent started his brand in 1962 after working at the house of Dior, where he was famously appointed head designer at young age 21. Many of fashion’s most iconic creations can be attributed to YSL, including the women’s tuxedo jacket, the high-fashion peacoat, and the shirt dress. In addition to iconic clothing, he was also among the first designers to feature non-white models. Yves stayed at the brand until his retirement in 2002. He died in June 2008.
The Italian-born Frenchman is lauded for his 20th century pieces that looked as though they were from the 25th century. As Cardin rose to fame in the age of the space race, his creations took on an air of futurism. His so-called bubble dresses had all the fixings of science fiction, combining earthly elegance with out-of-this-world colors and avant garde design. They may be wacky, sure, but Cardin’s clothes showed a freedom of expression that highlighted larger ideals, in particular the emancipation of women. The visionary designer fell out of critical favor when he attached his name to less fashionable items, from cars to umbrellas, but his futuristic, space-centric legacy will live to infinity and beyond.
In the 60’s, Valentino made a decision that would enhance his reputation; he sent Jacqueline Kennedy, the American First Lady and fashion icon, a series of his pieces to look over. She was enchanted with his designs, and even chose to wear one of his dresses when she married her second husband, Greek shipping tycoon Aristotle Onassis: her influence led to greater fame and fortune in North America.

One of the inclining styles to pick from the spring/summer gathering this year is the shirt-dress. Long shirt, which hit the stands a couple of years back, has just turned into a work of art. In any case, this season, creators have reconsidered the shirt-dress with an assortment of characteristics and cuts. Drop midriffs, twofold high openings, business shirts, unbalanced hemlines, mandarin-neckline: be prepared to set out upon an enterprise, and try different things with any hope to coordinate your identity as you play with this design patterns for ladies.


Fashion designer Issey Miyake used new technology to create innovative textiles with both Eastern and Western influences for his clothing line. Issey Miyake was born on April 22, 1938, in Hiroshima, Japan. In the 1960s, he designed for Givenchy in Paris, after which he designed for Geoffrey Bean in Manhattan. In 1970, Miyake started his own design studio. During the 1970s, he toyed with avant-garde Eastern designs. In the 1980s, he began using technology new East meets West textiles.
A designer with a notorious past, Christian Dior was also known for being in cahoots with the enemy during WWII, when he dressed Nazi wives and French collaborators in his designs. Despite this questionable choice, he still rose to prominence during the late-forties when the war was over…primarily due to his unparalleled mastery of line and shape. He gave women a desirable “flower silhouette” which always featured a nipped-in waist, a full, voluminous skirt, and a feminine, corseted bodice. Often, the hips of his suits and dresses were padded to balance the bust line and accentuate the wasp-waisted effect.
The people who prefer this are the ones who require everything at best quality. Nothing satisfies them if it is not worth the trouble. They often look for styles that make a statement on the quality, polished manner and culture. Most of them are the ones who are from higher status and are also in a way related to how a businesswoman would dress up. Sophisticated can be characterized as businesswoman minus the formal look. Culture and luxury mean the most to the people who choose this style of fashion.
Half-way garments are an alternative to ready-to-wear, "off-the-peg", or prêt-à-porter fashion. Half-way garments are intentionally unfinished pieces of clothing that encourages co-design between the "primary designer" of the garment, and what would usually be considered, the passive "consumer"[5]. This differs from ready-to-wear fashion, as the consumer is able to participate in the process of making and co-designing their clothing. During the Make{able} workshop, Hirscher and Niinimaki found that personal involvement in the garment-making process created a meaningful “narrative” for the user, which established a person-product attachment and increased the sentimental value of the final product.[5]
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In the Seventies, Halston befriended (and dressed) members of the international jet set, including Bianca Jagger, Liza Minnelli, and Liz Taylor. Dressed in his trademark black turtleneck, he could often be found partying at Studio 54 and enjoying his success with a host of celebrity friends. Licensing deals made him very wealthy, but tragedy lay in the distance…drug addiction and an AIDS diagnosis in 1988 led to his downfall. Unable to cope with the demands of his career, he was fired from his own company…Halston died of AIDS-related complications in 1990.

Valentino started his brilliant and admirable career in the world of fashion in 1950 when he moved to Paris to study design. His classically elegant and feminine designs made women look utterly glamorous. The Italian maestro worked at houses Dessus and Laroche before going back to Rome to set up his business in 1959. By the mid-1960s, Valentino was a favorite designer of the world’s best-dressed women, including Jacqueline Kennedy. Among his signatures is a particular fabric shade, known as “Valentino red.”


A super adorable blast-from-the-past fashion style, the 50s look is all about bright and pastel colors (unless you’re doing a more ‘pinup’ theme, then you’ll wear black and red very often!) in adorable fashions, usually featuring an assortment of flowers and polka dots. Women will typically either wear a high ponytail or lovely curls with this fashion, and poodle skirts are an absolute must.
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