The pace of change accelerated considerably in the following century, and women and men's fashion, especially in the dressing and adorning of the hair, became equally complex. Art historians are therefore able to use fashion with confidence and precision to date images, often to within five years, particularly in the case of images from the 15th century. Initially, changes in fashion led to a fragmentation across the upper classes of Europe of what had previously been a very similar style of dressing and the subsequent development of distinctive national styles. These national styles remained very different until a counter-movement in the 17th to 18th centuries imposed similar styles once again, mostly originating from Ancien Régime France.[17] Though the rich usually led fashion, the increasing affluence of early modern Europe led to the bourgeoisie and even peasants following trends at a distance, but still uncomfortably close for the elites – a factor that Fernand Braudel regards as one of the main motors of changing fashion.[18]
Black activists and supporters used fashion to express their solidarity and support of this civil rights movement. Supporters adorned symbolic clothing, accessories and hairstyles, usually native to Africa. Politics and fashion were fused together during this time and the use of these symbolic fashion statements sent a message to America and the rest of the world that African Americans were proud of their heritage.[86] They aimed to send an even stronger message that black is beautiful and they were not afraid to embrace their identities.[86] An example would the Kente cloth, it is a brightly colored strip of cloth that is stitched and woven together to create different accessories.[86] This woven cloth of brightly colored strips of fabric became a strong symbolic representation of pride in African identity for African Americans of the 1960’s and later. It was developed into what is called a dashiki, a flowing, loose fitting, tunic style shirt. This cloth became one of the most notorious symbols of this revolution.[87]
Hopefully we have given you some creative new fashion blog post ideas. What are some of your go-to ideas for blog posts as a fashion and style blogger? Which one of these are your favourite fashion blog ideas? Share it with us in the comment section! If you’re in need of some more sartorial inspiration, check out our post on fashion influencers to follow for SS18.

Why: While Lesego doesn’t have a blog per se, she does have a very active Instagram full of gorgeous photography and thoughtful captions (she occasionally dabbles in vlogging too). Be it the latest fashion trends, amazing lingerie or even those tricky to style narrow sunglasses, she’s a deft hand at styling and out to destroy any preconceptions of what a curvy girl can and can’t wear.
June 5, 2016 By fashionandstylepolice in Blogging Tips, Fashion Tags: 30 Blog Post Ideas for Fashion Blogs, Children's Style, Fashion, Fashion and Style Police, Fashion Blog Post Ideas, Fashion Blog UK, Fashion Blogger UK, Fashion Designers, Fashion News, Fashion trends, Fashionistas, High Street Fashion, High Street Shops, Moodboards, Outfit Photography Tips, Red Carpet Fashion, Red Carpet Style, street style, Style, Uk Bloggers, Wardrobe essentials, Who Wore It Better, Wishlist 59 Comments
There has been great debate about politics' place in fashion and traditionally, the fashion industry has maintained a rather apolitical stance.[72] Considering the U.S.'s political climate in the surrounding months of the 2016 presidential election, during 2017 fashion weeks in London, Milan, New York, Paris and São Paulo amongst others, many designers took the opportunity to take political stances leveraging their platforms and influence to reach the masses.[73][74]
Anthropology, the study of culture and human societies, studies fashion by asking why certain styles are deemed socially appropriate and others are not. A certain way is chosen and that becomes the fashion as defined by a certain people as a whole, so if a particular style has a meaning in an already occurring set of beliefs that style will become fashion.[62] According to Ted Polhemus and Lynn Procter, fashion can be described as adornment, of which there are two types: fashion and anti-fashion. Through the capitalization and commoditisation of clothing, accessories, and shoes, etc., what once constituted anti-fashion becomes part of fashion as the lines between fashion and anti-fashion are blurred.[63]
1 : to give shape or form to : to make, construct, or create (something) usually with careful attention or by the use of imagination and ingenuity fashion a lamp from an old churn a figure fashioned from clay … delegating to the commander-in-chief the power to fashion the rules of the military justice system …— Fred Strasser Up there in the mountains old ladies … are still hooking rugs … and fashioning dainty dolls out of corn shucks.— Richard Atcheson
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