This site is a go-to for fashion-forward women who are shopping on a budget. Not only is the site dedicated to recreating celebrity looks with cheaper options (that look very similar, if not identical!), but it also is a source for style tips and the latest trends. See an outfit you love on Chrissy Teigen? Just hop over to the site to find out how to have it without spending three months worth of paychecks.
June 5, 2016 By fashionandstylepolice in Blogging Tips, Fashion Tags: 30 Blog Post Ideas for Fashion Blogs, Children's Style, Fashion, Fashion and Style Police, Fashion Blog Post Ideas, Fashion Blog UK, Fashion Blogger UK, Fashion Designers, Fashion News, Fashion trends, Fashionistas, High Street Fashion, High Street Shops, Moodboards, Outfit Photography Tips, Red Carpet Fashion, Red Carpet Style, street style, Style, Uk Bloggers, Wardrobe essentials, Who Wore It Better, Wishlist 59 Comments

In the fashion industry, intellectual property is not enforced as it is within the film industry and music industry. Robert Glariston, an intellectual property expert, mentioned in a fashion seminar held in LA[which?] that "Copyright law regarding clothing is a current hot-button issue in the industry. We often have to draw the line between designers being inspired by a design and those outright stealing it in different places."[69] To take inspiration from others' designs contributes to the fashion industry's ability to establish clothing trends. For the past few years, WGSN has been a dominant source of fashion news and forecasts in encouraging fashion brands worldwide to be inspired by one another. Enticing consumers to buy clothing by establishing new trends is, some have argued, a key component of the industry's success. Intellectual property rules that interfere with this process of trend-making would, in this view, be counter-productive. On the other hand, it is often argued that the blatant theft of new ideas, unique designs, and design details by larger companies is what often contributes to the failure of many smaller or independent design companies.

Why: The leggy blonde provides a tres chic mix of outfit inspiration – her personal style definitely has that insouciant French vibe – and trend and brand lowdowns. The ‘boutique’ section of her site is a one-stop shop for the pieces she loves – and we also like the fact she has regular wardrobe clearouts via Vestiaire so true Camille-alikes can snap up her actual clothes…

A report from New York Fashion (Spring 2015) week found that while 79.69% of models on the runway were white, only 9.75% of models were black, 7.67% were Asian, and 2.12% were Latina. The lack of diversity also accounts for not only designers but models too, out of four hundred and seventy members of The Council of Fashion Designers of America (CFDA) only twelve of the members are black.[90] From the same study on New York Fashion Week, it was shown that only 2.7% of the 260 designers presented were black men, and an even smaller percentage were black female designers.[90] Even the relationship between independent designers and retailers can show the racial gap, only 1% of designers stocked at department stores being people of color. It was also found that in editorial spreads, over eighty percent of models pictured were white and only nine percent were black models. These numbers have stayed stagnant over the past few years.[90]
Fashion is a popular aesthetic expression in a certain time and context, especially in clothing, footwear, lifestyle, accessories, makeup, hairstyle and body proportions.[1] Whereas, a trend often connotes a very specific aesthetic expression, and often lasting shorter than a season, fashion is a distinctive and industry-supported expression traditionally tied to the fashion season and collections.[2] Style is an expression that lasts over many seasons, and is often connected to cultural movements and social markers, symbols, class and culture (ex. Baroque, Rococo, etc). According to sociologist Pierre Bourdieu, fashion connotes “the latest fashion, the latest difference.”[3]
Even though they are often used together, the term fashion differs from clothes and costume, where the first describes the material and technical garment, whereas the second has been relegated to special senses like fancy-dress or masquerade wear. Fashion instead describes the social and temporal system that "activates" dress as a social signifier in a certain time and context. Philosopher Georgio Agamben connects fashion to the current intensity of the qualitative moment, to the temporal aspect the Greek called kairos, whereas clothes belong to the quantitative, to what the Greek called chronos.[4]
In the 16th century, national differences were at their most pronounced. Ten 16th century portraits of German or Italian gentlemen may show ten entirely different hats. Albrecht Dürer illustrated the differences in his actual (or composite) contrast of Nuremberg and Venetian fashions at the close of the 15th century (illustration, right). The "Spanish style" of the late 16th century began the move back to synchronicity among upper-class Europeans, and after a struggle in the mid-17th century, French styles decisively took over leadership, a process completed in the 18th century.[19]
3. Give “them” a “package deal”. If you have a taste for looking good, why not pass that gift on to others? Many (i mean it) people who follow fashion blogs have very little fashion sense, so if you provide them with something like a good looking outfit, they will be more prone to share/like/follow. I’m not saying give away $200 jeans; i mean put those clothes together (on yourself or just laid out), snap a picture, and put it up as “the outfit for the day” or whatever. You can even geo-target this and base the outfit on the weather (or whatever).
SYNONYMY NOTE: fashion is the prevailing custom in dress, manners, speech, etc. of a particular place or time, esp. as established by the dominant section of society or the leaders in the fields of art, literature, etc.; , style, often a close synonym for , fashion, in discriminating use suggests a distinctive fashion, esp. the way of dressing, living, etc. that distinguishes persons with money and taste; , mode, the French word expressing this idea, suggests the height of fashion in dress, behavior, etc. at any particular time; , vogue stresses the general acceptance or great popularity of a certain fashion; , fad stresses the impulsive enthusiasm with which a fashion is taken up for a short time; , rage, craze both stress an intense, sometimes irrational enthusiasm for a passing fashion
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